MicroSoft

As if you weren’t aware, your SharePoint environment could very well be a gigantic jumble of content. More than half of SharePoint deployments now measure well over 1 TB of content. Every year, this content grows around 65 percent.

Just a few years ago, Satya Nadella was given the role of CEO and announced his Mobile First, Cloud First initiative for Microsoft. For Microsoft watchers, it was a big statement from a new CEO of a massive software company. Some may have scoffed a little at the statement.

 

There is a widespread perception that creating a hybrid on-premises and cloud environment using Microsoft SharePoint is complicated and costly. This is far from the truth – in reality, it is really no different than when you’ve been tasked to join two systems together in the past.

 

With Microsoft’s generous offers of making Office 365 more available to students, many IT administrators expect easier management responsibilities with user licenses and their data. Yet after implementing Office 365 within an educational environment, IT pros need to rethink the way they manage student or faculty data. This is especially important if you’re migrating data and documents from a non-Microsoft system to OneDrive for Business.

Today’s surprise announcement that Microsoft would buy LinkedIn for $26.5 billion came off as a shock but it shouldn’t. It’s clear, based on the official announcement, that Microsoft’s intention to buy LinkedIn wasn’t just a significant advance in acquiring the world’s biggest business social networking site. It’s an investment in global, cloud-based professional productivity.

Are you using SharePoint 2010? Attendees from our Microsoft Office 365 & SharePoint 2016 Roadshow along with unofficial webinars polls found that an overwhelming majority of attendees are using SharePoint 2010. Of course, many of these attendees asked us, “How do I move from SharePoint 2010 to 2016?” While the migration process of skipping a version of SharePoint has always been the same, most of the answers given are either wrong or not completely correct. It’s confusing for many.

 

A David and Goliath Backup Story: Why You Want Small SharePoint Backups

Sometimes it’s good to be the big guy. People look up to you, amazed at how big you are. You always get picked first for sports teams. The view is much better. However, if you happen to be a backup file, bigger is definitely not better. You get little love. Administrators tolerate you at best and avoid you at worst. And when you are called to recover against a small backup, you lose every time.

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