SharePoint 2013

  

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Recovery Point Objective (RPO) and Recovery Time Objective (RTO) are essential cornerstones of any disaster recovery (DR) or backup plan. In fact, attempts to formulate a DR/Backup plan without RPO & RTO are little more than best-guesses. So what are these concepts and why are they important?

 

Yesterday the release of a SharePoint 2016 beta was a buzz among SPTechCon attendees in Boston. Among rumors of missing the deployment deadline, the beta release arrived. All the details available are interesting. We’ve been looking at earlier builds internally for a little while, prior to the Preview going live.

 

At last week’s Microsoft Ignite conference, Metalogix demonstrated the culmination of many months of work that we've completed with Microsoft to address a huge pain point for any business in the process of migrating to SharePoint Online in Office 365 – the slow speed of migration.

 

Migrations of anything but vanilla SharePoint collaboration sites to SharePoint Online (SPO) are significantly more complex and time consuming than most clients think they will be (and some vendors will have you believe). There are a number of reasons for this, an important one is the migration speed to SPO. I've addressed the others in the latter part of this blog post.

 

A year ago the forecast would have stated 'It's all cloudy on theadoption front'

Yet, in 2015 it is clear that organisations are now dependent and not justwhistling at the cloud, as enterprises race to migrate and host their collaborationplatforms, social media marketing and business process applications in adedicated cloud or hybrid or on-premise infrastructure.

 

Administrators have the herculean task of juggling settings for multiple users and services, which can be incredibly tedious, repetitive, and daunting. Not all settings are centralized, especially for hybrid (combination cloud and on-premises) scenarios. Errors can creep in if administrators lose focus while multitasking.

 

Depending on their configurations, here are just some of the settings administrators might juggle:

Office 365 can provide rich cloud-based solutions for many business scenarios, but getting all users and services set up involves several administrative rounds before your users are fully ready to go.

 

You’ll likely need to traverse Office 365 admin center user management, purchasing, and billing settings, the Exchange admin center, the SharePoint admin center profile and OneDrive settings, and more.

 

The move to Office 365 and Exchange Online in particular, presents an interesting conundrum for the new IT administrator. With the consolidation of resources that comes along with a move to the cloud, the responsibility for administering and maintaining the environment is delegated to administrators who previously have had little to no experience with some of the services that are now under their purview.

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