Cloud

There is a widespread perception that creating a hybrid on-premises and cloud environment using Microsoft SharePoint is complicated and costly. This is far from the truth – in reality, it is really no different than when you’ve been tasked to join two systems together in the past.

 

If the Microsoft Ignite conference stressed anything, it was the continued focus on Cloud First technologies.

 

Last Saturday Metalogix sponsored SharePoint Saturday Dubai, an annual gathering of SharePoint experts and enthusiasts. Several MVPs were present including Joel Olesson and Michael Noel. They shared their insights and best practices. One of the hottest topics I was asked about was security in Office 365.

 

 

As the Product Manager for the Replicator product, I’m excited to write about the release of version 7.1. It was a great experience learning from our solution engineers, developers and customers about all of the capabilities within Replicator. One consistent message from all my teachers was that replication/synchronization of SharePoint content isn’t a simple thing, and that there’s a lot that goes into monitoring the flow of content from one location to the next.

 

Microsoft's Office has been a staple of business and organizations since it was first created. From a historical context, Office's popularity can be traced back to its ties to Microsoft Windows.

 

Hopefully you've been able to read Part One that covered the features like app launcher, cloud UI, OneDrive for Business, Search, Sharing, and Durable links. No, there was no particular reason how these features are divided, it just worked out that way.

It’s hard to believe that just 18 months ago some content management vendors were using phrases like, “as much cloud as you need” when they talked about hybrid, as if the only real advantage of storing and sharing files in the heavens  was so that they could easily accessed from anywhere, at any time, via any device, without a hassle. The idea was to keep most of your content on premise where it already lives, where it’s presumably safe, and where IT is in full control.

 

Are you using SharePoint 2010? Attendees from our Microsoft Office 365 & SharePoint 2016 Roadshow along with unofficial webinars polls found that an overwhelming majority of attendees are using SharePoint 2010. Of course, many of these attendees asked us, “How do I move from SharePoint 2010 to 2016?” While the migration process of skipping a version of SharePoint has always been the same, most of the answers given are either wrong or not completely correct. It’s confusing for many.

For the second time running, Metalogix SharePoint 2016 & Office 365 Roadshow brought experts and users of the scene together in Zurich to exchange thoughts on developments, specific and general challenges as well as interesting practical examples.

 

Office 365 can provide rich cloud-based solutions for many business scenarios, but getting all users and services set up involves several administrative rounds before your users are fully ready to go.

 

You’ll likely need to traverse Office 365 admin center user management, purchasing, and billing settings, the Exchange admin center, the SharePoint admin center profile and OneDrive settings, and more.

 

Pages

Subscribe to Cloud