Migration Manager

Migrations of anything but vanilla SharePoint collaboration sites to SharePoint Online (SPO) are significantly more complex and time consuming than most clients think they will be (and some vendors will have you believe). There are a number of reasons for this, an important one is the migration speed to SPO. I've addressed the others in the latter part of this blog post.

Yesterday the release of a SharePoint 2016 beta was a buzz among SPTechCon attendees in Boston. Among rumors of missing the deployment deadline, the beta release arrived. All the details available are interesting. We’ve been looking at earlier builds internally for a little while, prior to the Preview going live.

It’s almost as if the world breathed a sigh of relief when Julia White, general manager for Microsoft’s Office Product Management wrote a blog post acknowledging that there would be another release of Sharepoint on prem, namely Sharepoint 2016.

“We know that the move to cloud doesn’t happen all at once,” she said. “While we’ve seen growing demand for SharePoint Online, we recognize that our customers have a range of requirements that make maintaining existing SharePoint Server deployments the right decision for some. We remain committed to meeting those needs.”

The move to Office 365 and Exchange Online in particular, presents an interesting conundrum for the new IT administrator. With the consolidation of resources that comes along with a move to the cloud, the responsibility for administering and maintaining the environment is delegated to administrators who previously have had little to no experience with some of the services that are now under their purview. For example after moving to Office 365, Admins have to contend with managing their users, not only in SharePoint, but in Exchange Online as well.

An increasing number of corporate employees use third-party cloud storage solutions like Google Drive and DropBox to store and share business content, potentially putting sensitive and confidential company at risk. But why is it taking IT so long to adjust to the needs of these users.

Well, consider these scenarios. First, IT can't pull out a credit card and commit to a three year investment in an enterprise cloud solution. And second, IT can't build out an internal infrastructure overnight without affecting other projects (aka “IT doesn't have a magic wand”).

Content collaboration is always at its best when end users in any organization know when others have contributed to their work content. SharePoint and Office 365 offer several different methods to notify users when content has been updated but, admittedly, it’s not perfect for a generation of professionals that are more Facebook and LinkedIn savvy than sorting through files on various drives.

A year ago the forecast would have stated 'It's all cloudy on theadoption front'

Yet, in 2015 it is clear that organisations are now dependent and not justwhistling at the cloud, as enterprises race to migrate and host their collaborationplatforms, social media marketing and business process applications in adedicated cloud or hybrid or on-premise infrastructure.

Last week, Bruce Schneier penned an excellent article that posed a straightforward question: Is Data a Toxic Asset? As Schneier is one of the world’s leading experts (if not THE leading expert) on all things information and “cyber” security, I recommend that every IT professional read it.

By the end of 2014, there were about 63.4 million iPhones in use around the United States according to Statista (Apple hasn’t released current user numbers). The takeaway is simple, tens of millions of iOS users have become accustomed to purchasing new devices and using their Apple ID to sync their photos, music, notes, contacts and bookmarks with iCloud.

So how do you get them to use content collaboration tools on those devices?

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